An MVCDS Education

Explore Our Curriculum

Intensives

  • E-Applied Ethics

    What should we do and how should we live? These questions form the heart of moral philosophy. In this course we will explore these questions. We will start by comparing competing theories of what makes actions right or wrong: utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics. By examining arguments for and against these views, students will develop a framework for writing and reasoning about moral problems and evaluating judgments of right and wrong. Weeks 2 and 3 of the intensive will be devoted to particular issues: abortion, euthanasia and assisted suicide, genetic enhancement, animal welfare, and criminal justice and punishment. With the help of guest speakers, field trips, and hands-on research, students will apply the study of moral reasoning to these problems by developing and defending moral arguments about the issues of their choice. Through this process, students will learn to ask questions, identify their own moral assumptions, raise and respond to challenges to their own points of view, and write and revise a paper that presents and defends a stance on a moral issue. At the end of the intensive students will have the opportunity to present their arguments and field questions from the wider community. English or Social Studies credit.
     
  • E-Dystopian Lit

    Ever since George Orwell published his 1949 novel, 1984, the term “Big Brother” has become synonymous with mass surveillance and government abuse. The dystopian genre has grown immensely in popularity in recent years, and this course will investigate how it has pervaded our culture, but also where it originated from and its essential elements. Lord of the Flies and Never Let Me Go will be foundational texts, but students will also read an array of short stories, in addition to analyzing its presence in film and television shows. During the course students will complete in-class and at-home writings, work with their hands to build their own dystopian world, and exercise their creativity in producing their own original dystopian tales.
  • E-Film Criticism

    What makes a film good or bad? Can a movie be better than the book? Can a film review be objective? How do economic forces shape movies? What is a “spoiler”? This intensive will dive into the art of film criticism and the history of film as popular and serious art. In addition to watching great films and writing reviews and criticism, we will read related works of fiction and nonfiction and analyze their relationship to film as forms of storytelling. Writing, reading, and discussion figures heavily in this course.
  • E-Journalism

     In this course, students will study a variety of journalistic genres, including magazine, newspaper, and broadcast. Students will practice reading different news stories and then work to emulate writing styles and create their own versions. Skills will include effectively conducting interviews, avoiding bias in writing, using photography and video to enhance a story, and editorializing. The emphasis of the course will be creation, and students will work to create their own collaborative versions of a newspaper, a magazine, and a television broadcast. Guest reporters and field trips to WNWO and The Blade will also be part of this course to help students gain an understanding of journalism in action and allow opportunities to learn about journalism as a profession.
  • E-Journalism

     In this course, students will study a variety of journalistic genres, including magazine, newspaper, and broadcast. Students will practice reading different news stories and then work to emulate writing styles and create their own versions. Skills will include effectively conducting interviews, avoiding bias in writing, using photography and video to enhance a story, and editorializing. The emphasis of the course will be creation, and students will work to create their own collaborative versions of a newspaper, a magazine, and a television broadcast. Guest reporters and field trips to WNWO and The Blade will also be part of this course to help students gain an understanding of journalism in action and allow opportunities to learn about journalism as a profession. 
  • E-Medieval Lit/Miss

    In this course, students will read and write about important works from the Middle Ages, and they will also construct small-scale medieval weapons.  Beowulf, The Adventures of Robin Hood, The Canterbury Tales, and Tales of King Arthur will be the focus of the reading part of this course.  These works incorporate character types, themes, and values that are typical of the heroes and villains, as well as the aristocrats and the commoners found in the Middle Ages.  Students will have regular in-class and at-home writing assignments, including a research paper.   The other part of the course involves students working on a variety of tabletop weapons seen in the Middle Ages.  The materials may be wood, popsicle sticks, clothespins, rubber bands, duct tape, and glue, but you can still get quite a bit of power out of these small catapults, trebuchets, ballistae, bows and arrows, and other weapons.  Students will explore the physics of each project to try to get maximum oomph with minimal materials.
  • E-Modern Graphic Novel

    Prerequisite: English II
    This intensive will look at the development of the modern graphic novel from the roots of sequential art in cave paintings and historical artifacts such as the Bayeux Tapestry through the development of comics to its current form. We’ll look at how sequential art tells a story visually and how even the text in a graphic novel has visually communicative elements. We’ll be reading Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics, and selections from Will  Eisner’s Comics and Sequential Art and Graphic Storytelling. The Graphic novels we’ll look at include Eisner’s Dropsy Avenue, Maus and Maus II by Art Spiegelman, as well as selections from other graphic novels, and comics from the 40s to present day. The focus will be on understanding how the graphic novel is both like and unlike the prose novel, and how sequential art enhances the telling of the story, but has its own limitations. You will write several short papers ­including one research­ based assignment, as well as several creative activities.
  • E-Mystery Story

     Prerequisite: English II
    In this course, students will discover the elements, conventions, and pleasures of the mystery story.  The appeal of these stories comes from the puzzle-like plots, its characters (including memorable detectives and villains), and the strange, spine-tingling atmospheric settings created by mystery writers. We will explore the beginnings of the genre with Edgar Allan Poe’s short stories and move to the Golden Age British classics through reading and viewing works by Arthur Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes) and the queen of mystery herself: Agatha Christie. In addition, our study will include contemporary mysteries where we will read and analyze African American detective fiction and investigate how women writers have used the genre to challenge the definition of gender roles. We will ponder over the following questions: What are the limitations of and potentials of the detective genre? What can a close study reveal in regard to sociocultural concerns or gender relations? As students become familiar with and write about types of mystery stories (such as locked-room capers) and elements (such as red herrings and arrogant detectives), they will write their own mystery stories too. Hands-on work includes basic forensic science labs (such as blood spatters and fingerprinting) and the recreation of crime scenes. Your powers of observation and of close reading and writing, as well as problem solving, will be tested in this class
  • E-Myths/Legends

    This class may be taken for Life Science or English credit.  For both, we’ll begin the course by looking at historical myths and legends - the incredible feats of heroes and gods, the tall tales handed down from generation to generation, as well as more modern urban legends.  We’ll look back at the roots of these myths to find their earliest forms, try to understand the cultural context of these myths, as well as their function within the culture.  If you’re taking the course for Science credit, you’ll look at those myths through the lens of a scientist.  You’ll apply the scientific method to an examination of the Physics, Biology and Chemistry behind the myths to answer questions about whether these heroes could have done the things they are reported to have done or if there is any scientific truth to the legends.  The emphasis will be on analyzing the scientific claims of the myth or legend, researching the plausibility of those claims, and in experimentally testing them when possible.  If you’re taking the class for English credit, you’ll focus on looking at how the stories are shaped - the story frames that have allowed them to be passed down verbally or in writing, and how this passing down gives rise to variation in the story (and, if you’re thinking about the science, inaccuracy in reporting).  We’ll trace the stories through their roots and look at connections to more modern tales (Hercules, for example, bears some relation to Paul Bunyan - why is that?)  When we all come back together, the Science students will get to work together with the English students to tell a modern day version of these myths - one that sounds like a myth, but is biologically and physically possible.  English OR Life Science Credit.
  • E-Worldbuilding/Narrative

    Prerequisites: English II and Evolution of Human Thought

    In this intensive, students will look at how stories are told across media - film, short stories, and video games.  We will be collaboratively building a shared world with interesting characters to meet, enticing settings to explore, and things to discover.  This world will have a history, a government, and an economic system, and will be designed to be consistent with other worlds we encounter in stories, film, and video games.  Students will have a choice to build a post-apocalyptic world, a futuristic science fiction world, or a high fantasy world.  For English credit, we will learn about character, setting, and plot, and students will write short stories about the characters in their world, demonstrating their skill in creating engaging characters and immersive settings.  For social studies credit, the students will be focussed on building realistic political and economic systems and looking at how they can function in the setting they have chosen. So if they go with a high fantasy setting, they would need to figure out what types of political units exist in the world, and how they interact with each other. Does magic exist? If so, how does it alter the economic activity of the people? Questions that are, more often than not, ignored in most fantasy stories.
    We will have a Model UN-style crisis simulation with other territories in this world, the outcome of which will change the world we have built, and become the “hook” for our roleplaying adventure.  Finally, the class will break into gaming groups and spend time with a character they’ve developed role-playing in their world - discovering the places they’ve created and building a shared narrative, which will lead to the final major story students will write about their character’s adventures with their group (plot).
    Expect to read a lot, write a lot, game a lot (video games and roleplaying), and build a deeply immersive shared world with your friends and classmates that you can explore through games.
    Required: A Steam account (free), a PC or MAC for playing online games, and access to a video streaming service (or have a DVD player).  We will provide dice, roleplaying rules, and a wiki for building our world.
    Recommended: Role-playing experience, game-mastering experience, and video game experience with RPGs, as well as a love of stories and writing.
  • FA-Art Wars

    This course will be constructed similar to “Project Runway” with specific challenges that address different skills with each lesson and project. This class will offer students a comprehensive art experience that will introduce the students to a variety of artistic media. Students will explore many diverse art techniques and approaches, as ways of communicating their ideas. This will be accomplished through the process of art production, the study of art history, and the exploration of critical thinking. Students will engage in lessons in drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, mixed media and ceramics as part of each challenge. In each area, students will apply the elements and principles of design, art criticism, and make connections to historical and contemporary cultures.  Students will explore conventional and unconventional artistic processes to complete challenges. Works will be critiqued and analyzed in class and by the community.
  • FA-Chem of Art

    We will explore the relationships between Chemistry and Art by describing the interaction of light and matter to produce color, understanding the physical and chemical properties of the materials that artists use (including: paint, pigments and binders; fibers and dyes; glass; ceramics; and the special case of frescoes), and exploring some of the scientific and aesthetic techniques used to explore the authenticity of certain works of art or artifacts.
    The course will be a combination of lecture, discussion, demonstration, and projects/experiments performed by small groups.  The laboratory/studio portion of the course is designed to extend and enhance the lecture topics as both chemists and artists highly value personal interaction and experimentation with materials.  The projects will be selected to give students a broad exposure to the particular chemical substances used in the creation of art, as well as an opportunity to create artistic works with them. The course will culminate in a project developed by each of the groups with findings presented to the other members of the class.
    This course can fulfill ½ credit of Physical Science OR Fine Arts elective credit
     
     
  • FA-Digital Photo

    In this course students learn the basic principles of digital photography and explore the photographic process from pre-visualization, to taking images, to adjusting and manipulation of digital images. Students will be investigating how to use photography to tell a story and will explore narrative both through individual images, series and incorporation of text. This course will emphasize learning the design principles, composition, and fundamental history and theory of photographic media. Students will approach various subjects and narratives to create images and projects that are personal and expressive.

    Supplies: Camera 
  • FA-Drum Line

    Drumline is an activity that fosters teamwork, self-discipline, problem-solving, and the desire to set and achieve challenging goals. In this intensive we will create a drumline and percussion ensemble that composes, practices, and performs original music tailored to the strengths, skills, and personalities of the class. Along the way, we will learn warmups and exercises designed to establish listening skills and ensemble cohesion across a range of percussion instruments. Students will learn how to match one’s playing with a group; how to use dynamics, meter, rhythm, and tempo in musical performance; and how to play in a range of indoor and outdoor settings, including a final performance on stage. Depending on the size and background of the group, we may include mallet percussion, auxiliary handheld percussion, and drum set in the ensemble. All levels of musical ability are welcome, but no previous experience is required for this course.
  • FA-Improvisation

    The student will develop as an actor using improvisational games. Starting from the exercises of Viola Spolin and Augusto Boal, the participants will learn the skills of improvisation and the key concept of “yes, and?” Other topics will include comedic improv, rehearsal exercises to develop characters, long form improv, and Commedia Dell'arte. The intensive will conclude with a public performance demonstrating these improvisation forms.
  • FA-Mixed Media

    This course will allow students the opportunity to experiment and combine artistic mediums to enhance their abilities to develop a personal visual language. This course will use traditional and nontraditional materials for artistic projects. Collage, photography techniques, printmaking, encaustic, assemblage, and sculpture will be explored. Students will be encouraged to use their unique talents and interest to explore the boundaries between drawing, painting, and sculpture. This course will also address contemporary and conceptual artists for inspiration and to guide their art making practices.
  • FA-Percussion

    The Percussion Ensemble course is an opportunity for students to explore the history of rock and roll drummers, and to learn rhythm, drumming and performance techniques. The students will form a percussion ensemble which will learn to play music by reading rhythmic parts to selected songs. Students will also be given assignments in composition, creating selections that will only involve percussion instruments. Additionally, each student will be assigned short and long research assignments on artists, music, and/or drum history to be presented to the class. A performance by the students will conclude the intensive.
  • FA-Show Choir

    The Show Choir intensive is designed for students to study and combine singing with synchronized movement.  Students will rehearse chosen vocal selections to be sung and memorized while learning techniques involved in basic movement.  The singing and the movement will initially be studied separately, and then combined to create a “show” modeled after performances that are given in show choir camps and competitions throughout the country.  Students will spend class time observing show choirs in high schools and universities to analyze various aspects of performance.  A performance by the students will be scheduled at the end of the intensive.
  • FA-Student Play

    The student will participate in mounting a fully produced play for public performances. In addition to casting from within the class, students will receive individual responsibilities like costumes, set, props, sound effects, lighting, and publicity. By November 1 the students will choose which play they will produce. The play will cover a current social justice or global issue (i.e. immigration, teen suicide, or school violence) and foster connections to the greater Toledo community.
  • M-Election 2020

    Description: Making decisions about complex social issues is rarely clear cut or straightforward.  Consensus is often impossible and a simple majority is not always the best option.  Are there alternatives?  As our political systems have developed, the decision making processes have become unwieldy and complex, creating debates about the electoral college and representation.  In this course we will try to understand the election process, and political system in general, through a mathematical lens.  How are results from primaries used to predict final election results? In a country as diverse and regionally unique as the United States, how are polls to be created and used to create predictions and make conclusions about popular opinion?  How are votes determined in the electoral college and why do we use this system?  Is there a purely mathematical way to make decisions or do we need to consider the human element?  How do the needs or wants of the many compare to the needs or wants of the few and can this be accurately quantified?  The goal of this course is to explore how math is used to make decisions on a broad scale and present data that is not purely scientific in nature, how it can be used well, and how it can be abused or used poorly.
  • M-History of Math

    The History of Math (Great Aha Moments of Math) will focus on interesting historical topics in math. The whole history of math can not be covered in three weeks, but we will explore interesting theories and the thought that went into them. What did they think of that?  Students will explore topics such as the history of numbers, constructions, Pythagoras Theorem, Zeno’s paradoxes, Pascal’s Triangle and binomial expansions, Number Theory, conic sections, Platonic solids, Inductive Proofs, Combinatorics, and series. We will spend time each day on problem solving and on AMC (American Math Competition) problems as well as more advanced talent search questions. Near the end of the intensive, students will choose a topic we’ve touched on to explore in more detail, or pick a new topic from the text or other sources to explore and report on.
  • M-Intro to Prob/Stats

    This course in introductory statistics and probability will introduce the student to descriptive statistics, uses and abuses of statistics, simulations, probability, and uses of statistics in the real world. Students will have the opportunity to do hands-on probability experiments and simulations. They will learn the basics of probability including the use of tree diagrams, rules of probability, combinations, permutations, and the binomial theorem; binomial and normal distributions; using the Ti-84 to perform simulations and find probabilities; displaying and analyzing data; and making predictions. The course will culminate in a project involving probability and statistics.  Required materials: Ti-84 graphing calculator.  Note: this course is open to Freshman who have completed Algebra I.
  • M-Intro to Stats


    Course Description: More and more programs in college now require a background in statistics, and virtually anyone pursuing a graduate degree must have a course in statistics. But we don’t have to wait until graduate school to see how statistics is useful. We will see that nearly nothing in this world is certain. There is always error involved in making predictions. Have you ever seen an ad on tv that looks suspicious? We will learn to view ads and media claims with a critical eye, and through statistics, sampling and experimentation, we will be able to test claims to see if they are misleading. We can also use sampling and experimentation to make predictions. We will also visit professionals in the field to see, for example, how statistics is used in polling, marketing, and medical research. We will make use of technology such as Ti-83 or Ti-84 graphing calculators to help us display and analyze data. We will also learn how to communicate our mathematical results clearly. This course would be a good stand alone class, or a great addition for a student planning to take, or who has taken, AP Statistics.

    Prerequisite: A solid base in algebra and good writing skills. Not, however open to Freshmen
    Supplies: Ti-83 and Ti-84 graphing calculators
  • M-Stats in Athletics

    Students will calculate and analyze various statistics from both team and spectator’s point of view. Recently, there have been various trends and analysis throughout the world of sports, and students in this course will not only algebraically solve problems, but will have in-depth discussion as to their legitimacy. The class will look at some of the statistics they may see on television or the internet and we will discuss what they mean and how to calculate. Students will look at what coaches particularly look at in high school, college and pro level, including some Maumee Valley athletics. We will tie in some of the probability, statistics, and graphs that  students will see on SAT’s and ACT’s. TI 83 or TI 84 graphing calculator is highly recommended.
  • O-Chinese Music

    This course is mainly designed for non-native Chinese speaking students who are curious or interested in Chinese music, art, and cuisine.  Each week, students will learn two famous Chinese pop songs, art, and cuisine.  For songs, students will learn basic Pinyin (Chinese phonics) to be able to sing songs.  For art, students will learn how to do Chinese calligraphy, paper cutting, Chinese knots, etc.  For cuisine, students will have the opportunity to choose what they want to cook and will cook their own lunch every Wednesday and Friday.  In the morning, students will study and do research about that day’s topic.  In the afternoon, students will have the time to do some hands-on activities.  No prior Chinese language or experience of the language is required. Elective credit
  • O-College Counseling

    Take 3 weeks and vanquish a whole lot of work and worry about the college application process!  Students will interview admissions counselors from different types of colleges, research programs, and learn about how to survive the college admissions process as well as how to survive the first year of college.  They'll get a great start on their college essays, learn how the Common App works, play around with different career paths, and have a chance to network with MV students who have attended colleges in various locations.  Open to juniors and sophomores.
  • O-Find your Zen

    Start or continue your journey to lifelong health and wellness with this intensive. We will build our physical strength by practicing various types of yoga, and trying out alternative forms of exercise including Tai Chi, strength/circuit training, and pilates. We’ll also learn about ways to support our mental health by exploring the benefits of daily meditation, art therapy, music therapy, mantras, and journaling about our experiences. We’ll look into the benefits of homeopathic remedies, aromatherapy, and non-invasive treatments like reiki. We will fuel our bodies with some healthy homemade recipes that we prepare as a group and learn about the importance nutrition has in many aspects of life. We’ll welcome some expert speakers and instructors throughout the intensive to share their crafts with us and with possible off-campus field trips including The Toledo Museum of Art, local yoga studios, and the Buddhist Temple of Toledo/Ann Arbor (health crisis permitting). During the final week of the course, students will have the opportunity to dive deeper into a topic of interest and develop a project and final presentation to showcase their research and experiences. This intensive is best suited for students who are open-minded and interested in learning about different methods and practices to live a healthy lifestyle. 
  • O-GLP TRIP

    The Global Leadership Program sponsors a student-planned foreign trip each year to a different country, in keeping with the Global Leadership theme for the year. Details of this trip to be posted by June, 2019. Students will have the option of obtaining social studies credit. Estimated cost: $4,000.
  • O-Health

    Health Education is a course that will empower students with the knowledge and skills needed to make responsible decisions and contribute to a healthy and safe society. Students will engage in the following topics: Human Anatomy & Organ Systems, Nutrition & Physical Activity, Substance Use/Abuse Education, Healthy Relationships & Intimacy, and Stress Management. Completion of this course is a graduation requirement generally taken by sophomore students.
  • O-Intercultural Communication

    Through the internet, we are able to meet people internationally without traveling overseas.  As a global citizen, being able to deal with cultural differences respectfully and peacefully is becoming a must-have communication skill to survive in a global world.  The main goal of the intercultural-communication intensive is to help students to understand cultural differences and how we can be offensive in our cultural bias.  During this three-week course, students will talk about the cultural iceberg, learn about the different communication styles, verbal and non-verbal codes, and body gestures among cultures.  We will also compare the differences and commonalities across cultures.  We will use the book "Intercultural Communication: A Contextual Approach" as the basis of the classroom study and understand cultural bias.  During the 3 weeks, we will read the book and discuss perspectives given in the book with a daily blog. We will discuss the unusual experiences of International travel. We will invite foreign nationals and let them share their experiences coming to America and how it was unusual for them. At the end of the 3 weeks, we will perform a skit showing some of the more unusual differences.
  • O-Network

    Maumee Valley has a long-standing relationship with 18 other schools that range from small to large, public to private, and rural to urban all across the United States and Puerto Rico. Students who choose “networking” will live with a host family and attend another school during an intensive. Exposure to another part of the country, another type of school, and a potential new set of friends offers an opportunity to travel, to explore, and to learn. Maumee Valley typically hosts a few students each year from networking schools for brief periods of two to three weeks. Networking is considered an independent study, so students should follow the deadlines for independent study proposals. Students are limited to one network experience during high school. However, students should submit a network application form, which is available on the US Resource Board in MyMV, to the Network coordinator, Tara Reineck.
  • O-Personal Finance

    This course will give students the tools and resources needed to make wise financial decisions.  Students will analyze their personal financial decisions, evaluate the costs and benefits of their decisions, recognize their rights and responsibilities as consumers, and apply the knowledge learned to financial situations encountered later in life. The students will answer a variety of questions that arise in everyday financial dealings both personal and business. Through various simulations, this course will focus on applications of the following concepts:  understanding different types of interest (simple interest, discount interest, compound interest), annuities, investing in stocks and bonds, Gross Income, Net Pay, Checking Accounts, Savings Accounts, Cash Purchases and Earning Potential, Credit (Credit Cards and Loans), Transportation, Housing, Record Keeping, valuation of bonds, filing taxes, and return on investments. Students will learn the basics of various types of businesses and what it takes to start and be a part of a business.
  • O-Robot vs. Robot

    This intensive is modeled around the formula of the BEST-robotics competition.
    Two teams will utilize a VEX robotics kit to be driven remotely in a timed/themed competition. Participants will learn the design and engineering processes needed to fabricate a functioning robot. An engineering notebook will serve to record the engineering processes involved. 
    Week 1: Competition Rules, safety training and robot design
    Week 2: Fabrication/prototyping 
    Week 3: Finalized designs and time trials. 
    Competition will take place during the Intensive fair.
     
  • O-Shark Tank (Finance)

    Prerequisite: None
    Local Sharks are looking for the best products and businesses Maumee Valley student entrepreneurs have to offer. In this course, students will learn and apply concepts of business/product development, market research, factors of demand, factors of production, and pricing that will support them in creating a business plan.  In the final presentation, student entrepreneurs will come to the Shark Tank with a prototype, advertisements and presentation materials that will be used to pitch their product, convincing the Sharks to invest in their businesses.
  • O-Spain Trip

    This course allows students the opportunity to travel mainly throughout the Andalusian region of Spain and to immerse themselves in the culture of the country by visiting historical and cultural sites and staying with host families. The length of the trip is approximately 14 days. Students will visit various cities and cultural centers, including Madrid, Toledo, Granada, and Sevilla among others. The course is recommended, but not limited to Spanish students. The goal of the intensive is twofold; improve students’ conversational skills by immersing them in the Spanish language and broaden student’s awareness of different cultural influences in Spain. Each day of the itinerary will be highlighted by people, places, and themes.  Students will learn of unique stories about important ecological, social, cultural, and economic issues, all told in context, allowing students to make meaningful connections to reach deeper levels of understanding. WL or Elective Credit.  Estimated cost: $4,200
  • O-Sports Medicine

    The Sports Medicine intensive will take a deep dive into the anatomy and physiology of exercise science which includes the muscular and skeletal systems, body tissues, joints, tendons, and ligaments. This course will also discuss common sports injuries, techniques in prevention and wellness, and treatments such as physical therapy, chiropractic care, and surgery. The role of technology in diagnosing and treating common injuries will also be explored.
  • O-UT CompSci

    Maumee Valley and the University of Toledo are joining forces to create a one-of-a-kind internship program for high school students. Highly qualified high school students will receive hands-on training in computing, simulation gaming, and 3D virtual immersive reality. The program is designed for four to five students per year with strong computing, code writing skills and interest. Also students with strong skills in visual design using technology are encouraged to apply.

    Entrance into the program is a selective process that includes an application and an interview. Once accepted into the program, students may be assigned preliminary work or study to make sure they are ready to begin. A student’s initial experience will occur during an intensive period when the student will spend the term at the University of Toledo’s R-1 Simulation Game Studio. Students will be assigned to project teams based on their readiness and aptitudes. Project teams consist of upper level undergraduates, graduate students, and professors who work on real projects for real clients. Work includes software development for on-campus, academically focused projects; grant funded national-level projects; and the design of programs for private clients.

    Students will receive individualized training based on what they need to know to successfully complete project assignments. After the initial intensive term, students may continue to be a part of the program depending on the student’s interests and availability. For instance, students may continue to work on projects on their own time during a rotation. Students may combine on site work at UT with virtual work. Students may also return to the simulation center for multiple intensives if students’ schedules allow. And finally, students will have opportunities to continue to work on projects during the summer. And once students have graduated from high school, they may have the option to combine summer courses at UT with paid internships in the simulation studio regardless of where they matriculate to college.

    During the intensive term at UT, each student will be assigned a mentor. All project teams in the simulation studio have a Faculty Mentor who oversees the team leaders. Our students will have one person assigned as mentor, evaluator, and liaison back to MVCDS.

    To apply to the program, students should indicate their intention to take the UT/MV internship when they pre-register for classes. They should also complete the application form available on the US resource board on MyMV and submit that with their course registration form. A screening interview will be scheduled with a representative from the University of Toledo. Students will be accepted into the program before parent conferences at the end of April. If students are turned down, they will be given advice about how to gain the skills and experience they will need to be stronger candidates in the future.
  • S-Bio II:Winter Survival

    Grades 10-12 Prerequisites: Biology I AND Chemistry I
    How do people and organisms survive the winter?  The trees have lost their leaves, crops have been harvested, and the ground is cold and covered in snow. How do humans preserve food when the growing season ends? How do modern techniques compare to those practiced by our ancestors?  How is food preservation scaled to accommodate the growing human population?  Why do some animals migrate or hibernate while others don’t?  Why do some plants lose their leaves, while others are green all year long?  Why do we dress in wool in the winter and not cotton?  We will explore how organisms (including humans) have adapted behaviorally and structurally to handle the long, dark winters.  We will be going outside in the cold and we will be dealing with anatomical specimens, so warm clothes and a strong stomach are a requirement! (Counts toward life science credit)
  • S-Chem of Art

    We will explore the relationships between Chemistry and Art by describing the interaction of light and matter to produce color, understanding the physical and chemical properties of the materials that artists use (including paint, pigments and binders; fibers and dyes; glass; ceramics; and the special case of frescoes), and exploring some of the scientific and aesthetic techniques used to explore the authenticity of certain works of art or artifacts.  The course will be a combination of lecture, discussion, demonstration, and projects/experiments performed by small groups. The laboratory/studio portion of the course is designed to extend and enhance the lecture topics as both chemists and artists highly value personal interaction and experimentation with materials. The projects will be selected to give students a broad exposure to the particular chemical substances used in the creation of art, as well as an opportunity to create artistic works with them. The course will culminate in a project developed by each of the groups with findings presented to the other members of the class.
    This course can fulfill ½ credit of Physical Science OR Fine Arts elective credit.
     
  • S-Electrical Eng (I)

    Prerequisites: Algebra I and Physics I
    In this course, students begin by learning foundational concepts from electromagnetism. They will investigate current, voltage, resistance, energy, and magnetism. Students apply their conceptual understanding as they draw and analyze series and parallel circuits, using mathematical tools such as Ohm’s Law and Kirchoff’s laws. They then design and construct their own circuits, working with resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, and transistors. Students examine electromagnetism applications to practical, everyday devices such as motors, lifting magnets, and stereo speakers. Finally, students are exposed to cutting edge topics in the field, including the physics behind solar cells and solid-state electronics. Students will leave the course with a better understanding of electrical engineering and its many applications to everyday life.


  • S-IR Methods

    This course introduces ninth grade students to the fundamental skills and habits of mind essential to continued study in the sciences.  Students will engage in meaningful research with their peers while focusing on different areas of scientific research, such as developing a strong research question and hypothesis, literature review, experiment design, data collection and analysis, and laboratory reporting.  An interdisciplinary team of teachers will provide expertise and guidance.  Math and social studies teachers will assist science teachers as students build understanding of cultural context of science and data analysis.  In coordination with our Student Support Specialist, students will also gain the tools they will need for a successful transition from Middle School.   Students will understand who they are as individual learners and practice strategies that support them in the learning process. Students will be well prepared for all future classes in high school, especially in the sciences.
  • S-Marine Science

    Marine Science builds on the physical science and life science concepts learned in previous science courses and applies that knowledge to the exploration of the living and nonliving environments of coastal and ocean systems. While much of the course will focus on the complex interactions of the marine food web, we will also explore the chemical and geologic aspects of oceanography.  The first part of the course will focus on giving students the background they need through laboratory experiments, discussions, field trips, projects, and independent research.  The second half will be a travel experience so that they can see these systems first-hand and participate in authentic research opportunities.  Ethical and social issues related to the marine environment and anthropogenic-induced climate change will be addressed throughout. (Counts toward life science credit) Approximate Cost: $3300.00.
  • S-Myths/Legends

    This class may be taken for Life Science or English credit.  For both, we’ll begin the course by looking at historical myths and legends - the incredible feats of heroes and gods, the tall tales handed down from generation to generation, as well as more modern urban legends.  We’ll look back at the roots of these myths to find their earliest forms, try to understand the cultural context of these myths, as well as their function within the culture.  If you’re taking the course for Science credit, you’ll look at those myths through the lens of a scientist.  You’ll apply the scientific method to an examination of the Physics, Biology and Chemistry behind the myths to answer questions about whether these heroes could have done the things they are reported to have done or if there is any scientific truth to the legends.  The emphasis will be on analyzing the scientific claims of the myth or legend, researching the plausibility of those claims, and in experimentally testing them when possible.  If you’re taking the class for English credit, you’ll focus on looking at how the stories are shaped - the story frames that have allowed them to be passed down verbally or in writing, and how this passing down gives rise to variation in the story (and, if you’re thinking about the science, inaccuracy in reporting).  We’ll trace the stories through their roots and look at connections to more modern tales (Hercules, for example, bears some relation to Paul Bunyan - why is that?)  When we all come back together, the Science students will get to work together with the English students to tell a modern day version of these myths - one that sounds like a myth, but is biologically and physically possible.  English OR Life Science Credit.
  • S-Phys II: P/O

    This course provides an introduction to optical science while learning to apply optical concepts to photography projects. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: polarization, interference, image formation, and resolution. Concepts learned will allow for purposeful and intentional photographic control of dslr cameras in class during image composition and acquisition, thus making students not only better physicists, but also better photographers. Students must provide their own camera.


  • S-Scientific Discoveries

    Is scientific discovery a series of Eureka! moments by brilliant people? Yes....and no.  In this course, we will be looking at what was going on in the world of famous scientists when their historic scientific discoveries were made and how those discoveries changed the world.  What experiences did Darwin have that made him think that all organisms shared a common ancestor?  Why did Einstein question Newtonian mechanics?  What technological breakthroughs allowed the transistor to go from unfeasible to a practical world-changing invention? How did Mary Anning overcome poverty and a lack of formal education to become one of the leading paleontologists of her time?  Why does Toledo Edison supply local homes and not Toledo Tesla? You will be delving into not only the "what" of scientific discoveries but the "how" and "why" and then discovering how the world has been impacted by those discoveries.  Hands-on labs where we recreate some of these discoveries along with diving deep into the cultural context of those who made them will take up the majority of our time.  Counts toward General Science Credit.
  • SS-Int. Relations

    The dynamics of international relations change constantly. Pictures of students facing down their own government’s tanks in Tiananmen Square have been replaced by images of counter terrorist operations in the Middle East. What are the historical and political causes of regional instability suggested in these images, and what can they tell us about our changing world order? Is the nation-state still the traditional power center of the international system in a world increasingly affected by globalization and humanitarian crises? How does the transnational flow of people, goods, and ideas shape some of the most pressing issues of today, such as state security and sovereignty? Students address these and other questions as they examine various geopolitical theories and the methodologies scholars use to understand and analyze world events.

    This course covers both the theoretical and the real world underpinning of international relations. Students learn how different actors, populations, regions, and global organizations relate to and affect one another. In addition, they examine issues such as culture, religion, environment, and technology alongside history, government, and economics. By exploring the interactions of these variables, students think critically about the complex forces that shape our world. Students will engage in debates, and run simulations to see how they would do as leaders of nations in the world today.
     
  • SS-Narratives in US History

    If history is written by the victors, there are a whole lot of voices not reflected in the dominant narrative.  In this course, students will examine American history from the perspective of people who are not always seen in the “single story”  of our history:  African Americans, Native Americans, immigrants, women, people from various Asian cultures, the  LGBTQ population, and the poor, to name a few.  Students will examine their own identities and look at how these identities interact with U.S. history through examination of  documents, images, and first-hand accounts of events from a variety of perspectives.  Major assessments include simulations, presentations, papers, and various forms of creative expression.
  • SS-War & Society

    The class will examine the impact of the military and conflict on both the ancient and modern world in terms of social and cultural norms and changes.  Students will research and analyze the strategic, technological, cultural, and political influence of warfare on human history and the development of civilizations from Ancient Greece to the war in Afghanistan. How and why we go to war, and the consequences of those wars will be the primary focus of the class. There will be several debates as well as a research paper.
  • SS-Worldbuilding

    Prerequisites: English II and Evolution of Human Thought
    In this intensive, students will look at how stories are told across media - film, short stories, and video games.  We will be collaboratively building a shared world with interesting characters to meet, enticing settings to explore, and things to discover.  This world will have a history, a government, and an economic system, and will be designed to be consistent with other worlds we encounter in stories, film, and video games.  Students will have a choice to build a post-apocalyptic world, a futuristic science fiction world, or a high fantasy world.  For English credit, we will learn about character, setting, and plot, and students will write short stories about the characters in their world, demonstrating their skill in creating engaging characters and immersive settings.  For social studies credit, the students will be focussed on building realistic political and economic systems and looking at how they can function in the setting they have chosen. So if they go with a high fantasy setting, they would need to figure out what types of political units exist in the world, and how they interact with each other. Does magic exist? If so, how does it alter the economic activity of the people? Questions that are, more often than not, ignored in most fantasy stories.
    We will have a Model UN-style crisis simulation with other territories in this world, the outcome of which will change the world we have built, and become the “hook” for our roleplaying adventure.  Finally, the class will break into gaming groups and spend time with a character they’ve developed role-playing in their world - discovering the places they’ve created and building a shared narrative, which will lead to the final major story students will write about their character’s adventures with their group (plot).
    Expect to read a lot, write a lot, game a lot (video games and roleplaying), and build a deeply immersive shared world with your friends and classmates that you can explore through games.
    Required: A Steam account (free), a PC or MAC for playing online games, and access to a video streaming service (or have a DVD player).  We will provide dice, roleplaying rules, and a wiki for building our world.
    Recommended: Role-playing experience, game-mastering experience, and video game experience with RPGs, as well as a love of stories and writing.
  • WL-Ecuador

    This course allows students the opportunity to attend Maumee Valley’s sister school, Comunidad Educativa Internacional Steiner in Guayaquil, Ecuador for a period of three weeks. Students will live with host families and engage in community service and social events. The goal of the program is to improve students’ conversational skills. The program incorporates a range of assignments to improve language competency, not limited to essays, blogs, and vocabulary quizzes. Students will have the opportunity to travel with teachers to another part of the country to learn more about the history, geography and culture of Ecuador. Past excursions have included visits to the Galápagos Islands and Cuenca, a World Heritage Site.
  • WL-Mayan Immersion


    Grades 10-12 Credit: Social Science or World Language
    This Intensive will provide a cultural and linguistic immersion into the ancient and modern Mayan world. Students will choose the Spanish language credit or Social Studies credit as their area of focus for a research project. We will study the history of indigenous groups in the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico prior to departing on our trip to this area. The intensive will include as much of the following as possible: visits to various Mayan ruins sites including Chichen Itza, Uxmal, and Tulum, short stays with host families, interaction with local anthropologists/archaeologists, a cooking workshop, museum visits, and opportunities to present your findings to the rest of the group. Students embarking on this intensive should be adventurous, curious, and willing to expand their comfort zones.   Approximately $2500
     
  • WL-Spain Trip

    This course allows students the opportunity to travel mainly throughout the Andalusian region of Spain and to immerse themselves in the culture of the country by visiting historical and cultural sites and staying with host families. The length of the trip is approximately 14 days. Students will visit various cities and cultural centers, including Madrid, Toledo, Granada, and Sevilla among others. The course is recommended, but not limited to Spanish students. The goal of the intensive is twofold; improve students’ conversational skills by immersing them in the Spanish language and broaden student’s awareness of different cultural influences in Spain. Each day of the itinerary will be highlighted by people, places, and themes.  Students will learn of unique stories about important ecological, social, cultural, and economic issues, all told in context, allowing students to make meaningful connections to reach deeper levels of understanding. WL or Elective Credit.  Estimated cost: $4,200
  • WL-World Cultures

    A broad interdisciplinary introduction to the issues underlying the study of global cultures, this course will address some of the forces that contribute to the shaping of different cultures by analyzing a variety of topics including migration patterns, food, politics, religion, economy, human rights, the environment, literature, art, and music, among others. This class will foster students’ cross-cultural awareness and intercultural competencies. It will strengthen their understanding of diversity and help develop an awareness of other people’s world views, of their unique way of life, as well as learn about contributions of other cultures to the world at large. Research, readings, films, and discussions will constitute integral components of the course. This class gives World Language credit but it is conducted in English.
Maumee Valley Country Day School is the only age 3 - 12th grade accredited, co-educational, independent school in Northwest Ohio and Southeast Michigan.